Empathy begins at home.

happy_childhood

I know that for a very long time I’ve had issues empathizing with others on a one to one basis (with a few rare exceptions like my children). It’s not that I like seeing others in pain or want to hurt them (I don’t, at all), more that I have had so much trouble connecting to my emotions, especially tender or vulnerable feelings, that this avoidance extends to everyone else. I’ve always felt empathy when it’s “safe” though–therefore I can cry for a character in a movie or novel, or even a TV commercial. I can get quite upset reading a news story about someone who’s been abused, especially if it’s an animal or a child.

But when it comes to real life people, I just can’t allow myself to get that close. I hold everyone at arm’s length. It’s too dangerous to let them in, because they might stir up emotions I haven’t wanted to feel. Of course this means emotional (as opposed to cognitive) empathy goes out the window too. You can’t feel an emotion for someone else if you can’t even access it for yourself.

It’s a common belief that all people who lack empathy are narcissists or psychopaths (or have some kind of schizoid disorder or psychosis, or autism). But a lack of empathy is also a common symptom in people with complex PTSD. Shutting off emotions–including empathy–is a defense mechanism that protects you from further harm. The problem is, this protection also “protects” you from feeling much joy or being able to really love anyone else.

Recently I’ve been feeling a kind of tender regard for my child-self/true self. Right now she’s not integrated and feels far away sometimes, but I can feel her sadness and pain. I can also feel that she’s a good person, a gentle sensitive spirit with so much love to give. I feel a tender protectiveness now where before I felt only shame and wanted to hide her away, just as she had been hidden away by the narcissists who “raised” her. So how was I any different from them, by keeping her hidden, projecting badness and shame onto her, refusing to see her strengths? Sometimes I just want to hold her like my own child. It’s not self-pity; it’s closer to empathy and even love.

Is this where empathy begins? Does it begin with loving yourself–your true self? If you hate your real self, you cannot learn to expand empathy onto others, since you can’t even empathize with yourself. If all you feel is shame, that is going to be projected onto others. That would apply to narcissists and the personality-disordered as well as people suffering from C-PTSD.   The problem for the disordered is it may be too late for some of them.  They are so thoroughly shielded by a false self they cannot even access their real selves or only with a great deal of difficulty that could take years.  There are much stronger defenses to break through.  They may be so shut off they can’t even see the lie they are living and think it’s everyone else–not them–with the problem.

The root of attachment and trauma disorders is is rejection of the self internalized from the people who were supposed to love you and mirror you; to heal, you must be able to develop empathy for your true self. That’s what my therapist has been helping me do.

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11 thoughts on “Empathy begins at home.

  1. I can so relate to this…I rarely have true empathy. Only a few times I can recall where I truly felt as if I was empathizing. I think I’ve had such significant hurt that nothing compares and I find it difficult to connect emotionally with anothers pain. Sometimes, its even with my children, and that makes me feel crappy as a mom.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are probably too hard on yourself. I’m too hard on myself too. But we beat oursevles up with guilt and shame, because of the early programming that brainwashed us that we were worthless and someting to be ashamed of, when the reality is, if we failed, it wasn’t our fault. We were programmed to fail by our narc “caegivers.” They wanted us to feel defective and apart from others, and we internalized those early messages and believed them. When you’re that young, your parents are “God” to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. “But a lack of empathy is also a common symptom in people with complex PTSD. Shutting off emotions–including empathy–is a defense mechanism that protects you from further harm.” Thank you so much for sharing this because this is something that has troubled me, from time to time–the fact that at times, I don’t feel anything, at least, not the way I think I should.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Very well said! I have been through a phase in life where I felt insensitivity to anyone’s emotions …as a way of masking my own vulnerability. I allude to this in my post called ‘Love broken down to …basics’ …because it all comes down to loving ourselves and owning our sensitivities. I hope you would check it out 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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